Contract Logistics & Volunteer Coordinator

2018 CONTRACT LOGISTICS AND VOLUNTEER COORDINATOR JOB DESCRIPTION

 

This position is in review. Applications are currently closed.

Required hours:

June 18 – September: 20 hours per week

October 5- 6: all day availability to work Texas Teen Book Festival

October: 40 hours per week

October 25- 29: all-in availability to work Texas Book Festival Weekend and post-Fest cleanup

Texas Book Festival Coordination and Logistics

  • Serve as primary liaison with Texas Book Festival Volunteer Committee Chairs (VCCs) managing all aspects of volunteer coordination including recruitment, meetings, correspondence, requests, retention, goodwill, and events
  • Serve as liaison with contract Festival logistics team, working with them and Executive Director to help manage Festival venues, tents, maps, banners, signage, exhibitors, and food vendors
  • Work with TBF Literary Director and Literary Communications Coordinator on all Festival venues as they relate to literary programming (set-up needs for A/V, furniture, backdrops, signage, green room, etc).
  • Help produce and set-up Festival session signage with TBF Literary Director and Lit/Comm Coordinator
  • Assist with TBF merchandise inventory and 2018 order, working with TBF staff, TBF Store Volunteer Committee Chair, and merchandise vendor on deadlines and deliverables
  • During Festival Weekend, manage VCC communication and assist with Festival set-up and break down, including step and repeat banners, Author Green Room supplies, trash collection, signage, and VCC supply return
  • Run logistics-related errands leading up to and during Festival Weekend, including printing and merchandise pick-ups/drop-offs, special event deliveries, special programming-related book deliveries, and errands as needed
  • Coordinate VCC Festival Weekend kickoff/appreciation event held during the week leading up to the Festival, including organizing catering, preparing supply bags, and preparing pre-Festival materials for the VCCs
  • Manage over-street banner placements with City of Austin, including communication, drop-off and pickup.
  • Assist with site logistics for Festival Author Lineup Announcement and other summer/fall events, as needed

Texas Teen Book Festival Coordination and Logistics

  • Serve as logistics coordinator for Texas Teen Book Festival, serving as liaison between TTBF director and TBF staff to coordinate tent and other rental needs, medical services tent, signage, and other logistical needs.
  • Serve as TTBF exhibitor coordinator, serving as point of contact for all TTBF exhibitors and being on-site contact during the TTBF on October 6, 2018
  • Assist with Texas Teen Book Festival set-up at St. Edward’s University on Friday, October 5, 2018, including coordinating exhibitor move-in and assisting with placement of Festival signage, wayfinding signs and any other set-up materials.

Communication and Administrative Support

  • Contact potential local and regional advertisers for program insert. Coordinate ad deadlines and deliverables
  • Other duties as assigned

Application Instructions:

To apply, submit the following to Maris Finn at maris@texasbookfestival.org

  • Cover letter
  • Resume
  • References upon request

Application deadline: May 31
Start date: June 18

Go Kayaking with TBF!

Enjoy the great outdoors (and indoors!) with the Texas Book Festival on Sunday morning, October 28, before the festivities begin!

There’s nothing quite like stretching and getting some fresh air on a crisp fall morning in Austin, and what better place to do so than our own Lady Bird Lake?

Join us for a morning spent kayaking—sign up here!

We’re so grateful to our partner Congress Avenue Kayaks this activity to Festivalgoers free of charge!

 

May Book Club

Our May Book Club picks are all about questioning what you know. Every book on this list, including Manuel Gonzalez’s incendiary, action-packed thriller, Nancy Isenberg’s examination of class in America, and Chuck Klosterman’s book-length essay urging us to quite literally question our commonly-held ideas, and Margaret Atwood’s  The Handmaid’s Tale (the television adaptation of which premiered on Hulu just last month), all invite us to re-think our realities.

 

 

The Regional Office is Under Attack by Manuel Gonzalez, 416 pages, Fiction

In a world beset by amassing forces of darkness, one organization—the Regional Office—and its coterie of super-powered female assassins protects the globe from annihilation. At its helm, the mysterious Oyemi and her oracles seek out new recruits and root out evil plots. Then a prophecy suggests that someone from inside might bring about its downfall. And now, the Regional Office is under attack. Recruited by a defector from within, Rose is a young assassin leading the attack, eager to stretch into her powers and prove herself on her first mission. Defending the Regional Office is Sarah—who may or may not have a mechanical arm—fiercely devoted to the organization that took her in as a young woman in the wake of her mother’s sudden disappearance. On the day that the Regional Office is attacked, Rose’s and Sarah’s stories will overlap, their lives will collide, and the world as they know it just might end.

 

The Nest by Cynthia D’Aprix Sweeney, 368 pages, Fiction

Every family has its problems. But even among the most troubled, the Plumb family stands out as spectacularly dysfunctional. Years of simmering tensions finally reach a breaking point on an unseasonably cold afternoon in New York City as Melody, Beatrice, and Jack Plumb gather to confront their charismatic and reckless older brother, Leo, freshly released from rehab. This is a story about the power of family, the possibilities of friendship, the ways we depend upon one another and the ways we let one another down. In this tender, entertaining, and deftly written debut, Cynthia D’Aprix Sweeney brings a remarkable cast of characters to life to illuminate what money does to relationships, what happens to our ambitions over the course of time, and the fraught yet unbreakable ties we share with those we love.

 

White Trash, the 400-Year Untold Story of Class in America by Nancy Isenberg, 480 pages, Nonfiction

But What if We’re Wrong by Chuck Klosterman, 288 pages, Nonfiction

But What If We’re Wrong? is a book of original, reported, interconnected pieces, which speculate on the likelihood that many universally accepted, deeply ingrained cultural and scientific beliefs will someday seem absurd. Covering a spectrum of objective and subjective topics, the book attempts to visualize present-day society the way it will be viewed in a distant future. Klosterman cites original interviews with a wide variety of thinkers and experts — including George Saunders, David Byrne, Jonathan Lethem, Alex Ross, Kathryn Schulz, Neil deGrasse Tyson, Brian Greene, Junot Díaz, Amanda Petrusich, Ryan Adams, Dan Carlin, Nick Bostrom, and Richard Linklater.

 

Joe Gould’s Teeth by Jill Lepore, 256 pages, Nonfiction

From New Yorker staff writer and Harvard historian Jill Lepore, the dark, spellbinding tale of her restless search for the missing longest book ever written, a century-old manuscript called “The Oral History of Our Time.” Joe Gould’s Teeth is a Poe-like tale of detection, madness, and invention. Digging through archives all over the country, Lepore unearthed evidence that “The Oral History of Our Time” did in fact once exist. Relying on letters, scraps, and Gould’s own diaries and notebooks—including volumes of his lost manuscript—Lepore argues that Joe Gould’s real secret had to do with sex and the color line, with modernists’ relationship to the Harlem Renaissance, and, above all, with Gould’s terrifying obsession with the African American sculptor Augusta Savage. In ways that even Gould himself could not have imagined, what Gould wrote down really is a history of our time: unsettling and ferocious

 

The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood, 311 pages, Fiction

In this seminal work of speculative fiction, the Booker Prize-winning author asks: In the world of the near future, who will control women’s bodies? Offred is a Handmaid in the Republic of Gilead. She may leave the home of the Commander and his wife once a day to walk to food markets whose signs are now pictures instead of words because women are no longer allowed to read. She must lie on her back once a month and pray that the Commander makes her pregnant, because in an age of declining births, Offred and the other Handmaids are valued only if their ovaries are viable. Offred can remember the days before, when she lived and made love with her husband Luke; when she played with and protected her daughter; when she had a job, money of her own, and access to knowledge. But all of that is gone now…. Funny, unexpected, horrifying, and altogether convincing, The Handmaid’s Tale is at once scathing satire, dire warning, and literary tour de force.

 

What are you reading this month? Share your May reads with us on Twitter @texasbookfest !

April Book Club

Happy Spring! For our April Book Club, our theme is “Spring Fever.” These books will take you from glitzy New York restaurant life to rural Texas to South Korea and everywhere in between. Whether you’re looking to escape your spring fever, or looking to spice up your book club, this list has a little something for every reader!

April Book Club (1)

What is Not Yours is Not Yours by Helen Oyeyemi, 352 pages, Short Stories.

Playful, ambitious, and exquisitely imagined, What Is Not Yours Is Not Yours is cleverly built around the idea of keys, literal and metaphorical. The key to a house, the key to a heart, the key to a secret—Oyeyemi’s keys not only unlock elements of her characters’ lives, they promise further labyrinths on the other side. Winner of the PEN Open Book Award, an NPR Best Book of 2016, as well as many other accolades, Oyeyemi’s stories are sure to spark conversation.

The Son by Philipp Meyer, 592 pages, Fiction.

Soon to be a TV Series on AMC starring Pierce Brosnan and co-written by Philipp Meyer! Part epic of Texas, part classic coming-of-age story, part unflinching examination of the bloody price of power, The Son is a gripping and utterly transporting novel that maps the legacy of violence in the American west with rare emotional acuity, even as it presents an intimate portrait of one family across two centuries.

Barkskins by Annie Proulx, 736 pages, Fiction.

Annie Proulx tells the stories of the descendants of Sel and Duquet over three hundred years—their travels across North America, to Europe, China, and New Zealand—the revenge of rivals, accidents, pestilence, Indian attacks, and cultural annihilation. Over and over, they seize what they can of a presumed infinite resource, leaving the modern-day characters face to face with possible ecological collapse. Finalist for the Kirkus Prize for Best Novel, a New York Times Notable Book, and a Washington Post Best Book of the Year.

Sweetbitter by Stephanie Danler, 386 pages, Fiction.

Newly arrived in New York City, twenty-two-year-old Tess lands a job working front of house at a celebrated downtown restaurant. What follows is her education: in champagne and cocaine, love and lust, dive bars and fine dining rooms, as she learns to navigate the chaotic, enchanting, punishing life she has chosen. The story of a young woman’s coming-of-age, set against the glitzy, grimy backdrop of New York’s most elite restaurants, in Sweetbitter Stephanie Danler deftly conjures the nonstop and high-adrenaline world of the food industry and evokes the infinite possibilities, the unbearable beauty, and the fragility and brutality of being young and adrift.

Rosemary’s Baby by Ira Levin, 256 pages, Horror.

Looking to shake up your book club this month? In this new Fiftieth Anniversary edition of the classic masterpiece of spellbinding suspense, evil wears the most innocent face of all. Rosemary Woodhouse and her struggling actor husband Guy move into the Bramford, an old New York City apartment building with an ominous reputation and mostly elderly residents. Neighbors Roman and Minnie Castavet soon come nosing around to welcome the Woodhouses to the building, and despite Rosemary’s reservations about their eccentricity and the weird noises that she keeps hearing, her husband takes a shine to them. Shortly after Guy lands a Broadway role, Rosemary becomes pregnant—and the Castavets start taking a special interest in her welfare. As the sickened Rosemary becomes increasingly isolated, she begins to suspect that the Castavets’ circle is not what it seems…

The Sympathizer by Viet Thanh Nguyen, 354 pages, Fiction.

*2015 Festival Author*

A profound, startling, and beautifully crafted debut novel, The Sympathizer is the story of a man of two minds, someone whose political beliefs clash with his individual loyalties. In dialogue with but diametrically opposed to the narratives of the Vietnam War that have preceded it, this novel offers an important and unfamiliar new perspective on the war: that of a conflicted communist sympathizer. Winner of the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction.

Staff Pick: The Vegetarian by Han King, 208 Pages, Fiction

Before the nightmares began, Yeong-hye and her husband lived an ordinary, controlled life. But the dreams—invasive images of blood and brutality—torture her, driving Yeong-hye to purge her mind and renounce eating meat altogether. It’s a small act of independence, but it interrupts her marriage and sets into motion an increasingly grotesque chain of events at home. As her husband, her brother-in-law and sister each fight to reassert their control, Yeong-hye obsessively defends the choice that’s become sacred to her. Soon their attempts turn desperate, subjecting first her mind, and then her body, to ever more intrusive and perverse violations, sending Yeong-hye spiraling into a dangerous, bizarre estrangement, not only from those closest to her, but also from herself. Winner of the 2016 Man Booker International Prize.

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